Tuesday, 3 March 2015

Adidas x UNTITLED

Fashion week this season left the crowd with a unique perspective towards fashion and how it's ever changing with our current times. Previously, the world of fashion creatives have always been easily associated with fantasy, recreating fairytales and making perfection look surreal for a few minutes in an editorial or fashion show. That's what made it so appealing to so many, the fact that it could just be a form of escapism. It used to make sense to be involved in a field that creates and fabricates life in the fashion industry.

However, this is no longer the case as fashion obviously wants to evolve into a more meaningful width as seen in so many fashion movements from previous years. Designers and consumers are becoming more and more aware of the importance to address the current concerns of society and global issues in their collections. It's eye-opening once you witness how these people can transform the bleak, realistic doubts we face everyday into delicate aesthetics. The meanings they convey are deeper and way beyond the blue/black/white/gold dress baloney the media is feeding everyone. This was prominently seen in one fashion show I attended two weeks ago in London, Curricular Activities which was sponsored by Adidas.

The event saw the launch of Untitled magazine, the first issue showcasing designers and talented individuals all below the age of 30 who have achieved success in their career. Hence, the name "Untitled" as they are unknown to the mass public. Lookbooks in the issue include a range of designer brands from Raf Simons, Briu Homme and MKI MIYUKI - ZOKU. 

Untitled x Adidas
Untitled Magazine now available at AllotmentStore in Leeds for £11.

Untitled x Adidas
Untitled x Adidas
Untitled x Adidas
Adam Jones SS15

Adam Jones showcased the collection I could familiarise myself most with because it possessed a very northern feel to it. The laser cuts, mix of mesh and leather material as well as a variety of dirty printing really brought out that aspect. The music played, peeked collars and light, wedged pool-sliders displayed the laid back, chilled attitude fashion has up in the northern cities. Although he graduated from Manchester, I can see some of this also reflected in Leeds' grunge architectural shades and the more dark artistic style the north of England differs in comparison to London. Gloomy weather and dirty buildings make great clothes.

"I see the beauty in the ugly, and that was the source of inspiration for my final collection, I wanted to celebrate the mundane. The collection sees the beauty in things others overlook around them on the street, the layers upon layers of peeling paint on old walls, discarded rubbish and stray cats hanging around the bins waiting for pigeons. I call it a wabi-sabi (beauty that is imperfect) view of Great Britain." Adam Jones during Manchester GFW.

Untitled x Adidas
Artwork display by Alex Harrod Edwards

Untitled x Adidas
Untitled x Adidas
Untitled x Adidas
Untitled x Adidas
Untitled x Adidas

Certainly one of the most notable during event was Jonathan Briu of Briu Homme's Autumn/Winter 2015 fashion installation, entitled "Are You Consumed?". First look at this already had me knowing it was a consumer related fashion movement, his point across the collection was very point blank and he was most passionate to express the essence to Consume by Means of Freedom. Different from the likes of Vivienne Westwood's Climate Revolution shirt and Marc Jacobs 2013 nylon totes was that this had a more Andy Warhol pop art approach to consumerism. Favourite public products with imprinted "ingredients" on the shirts and nutritional values stating percentages of social values such as self confidence, vanity and very low creativity. Jonathan made it clear that he wanted a repulsed crowd instead of one who would find it only pretty radiant. In the yellow tshirt is Tamara Amalie Anderson wearing a "I can't believe it's not Cotton!" print.


Untitled x Adidas

Charlotte Bruton's Menswear was a fusion between modern, cut-throat formal menswear and sports functionality, entitled "I have to return some videotapes". Her collection was inspired by novel American Psycho's Patrick Bateman and his Wall Sreet, serial killer edge. The garments revolved around raw fabrics like crinoline and waterproof nylon, giving personality towards silhouette and tailored texture. I'm relatively new to menswear although ever since I started working for a designer menswear store, I've slowly understood the complexity of necklines, structure and material for the male body. Charlotte showcased all these factors entirely wholesome that taking a good still shot was less important because I just wanted to witness the whole collection in harmony. Not to mention the song playing (Jai Paul - BTSTU) pretty much summed up the concept.


Untitled x Adidas
Untitled x Adidas
asos vest; newlook shoes; H&M shell structure skirt and white button down

All photos taken by myself during the event, except for the OOTD shot. My outfit photos were taken by Tatjana Apukhtina, who recently launched a fashion app called "Looks Good On Me". It's basically like snapchat but for outfits providing better feedback on your OOTD (check it out, guys). I'll post my review on this app in a later post.

Tuesday, 3 February 2015

Fashion blogging is a serious hobby.

I used to struggle making essays in primary school, not because I had literacy issues but it was the fact that we were to write essays based on the topics that were provided. Limited options that I just couldn't wrap my head around. My biggest fear was this one essay question that everyone else seemed to be able to approach more humanly. That one question that always had me mentally unprepared. It was

 "WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE HOBBY?" (write within 200-300 words)

This question would leave me in a stunt, life-questioning state. This is a writing student's nightmare! And look at that undersized word limit, whose crazy idea was this question???

Okay so, beyond this rant was the fact that somehow, every time I had to face this ridiculous question, I was forced to tap into my creative side and come up with a 300 word essay on a random hobby I pretended to have. It's not that I didn't have a hobby, I just didn't have a specific favourite one. I liked reading, writing, biking, sleeping, logging onto divastarz.com but I never did any of those consistently and grew out of some of them. I don't want my blog to go down the same path.

I took a pause from blogging since my last post to focus more on building a fashion portfolio in journalism rather than my amateur posts on ninaaneko. I really enjoy creating inspired outfits but writing decent fashion related articles is what I love doing. Fashion bloggers have a negative reputation for being well-heeled, wardrobe full subjects, prancing around the street or their house taking photos, only to post them on their blog for the world to see. Of course, this is far from the truth as I don't have that kind of wardrobe nor an official cameraman. I like to think that we put in that much effort as a way of translating creativity into our clothes and wanting to visually record it. I knew it would be better to deviate from this stereotype so I stopped blogging for a couple of months to get more involved in fashion and actually write articles that were more meaningful or had potential to be contributive. I think this short break taught me more than I could of imagined but now I've missed blogging. A few weeks back, when I handed in my CV, I was asked what my favourite hobby was and automatically I replied, "fashion blogging". This time, unlike all those essays I wrote - it felt natural and not pretentious at all. In an attempt to blog yet still feel productive I've decided to start writing more challenging posts about what i'm truly interested in. I will still post an outfit from time to time but I don't want that to be my main focus anymore. Fashion has definitely taught me that it's not about what I can wear - it's what I can make of it.

On a less serious note, i'm just going to throw in some random outfit shots I took over my short absence from the blogosphere! I've posted some on instagram before (@ninaaneko).

S I N G A P O R E

singapore singapore
fareast plaza shoes; love moschino bag; zara top; topshop pants from Iman; photos by Iman

B R I T I S H  F A S H I O N  A W A R D S  2 0 1 4  -  L O N D O N

British Fashion Awards British Fashion Awards
asos top; skirt designed and created by my mother; photos by Lenny

L E E D S

Leeds
LEEDS
Leeds
dorothy perkins coat; CO skirt; george cable knit; thrifted shoes; Qeela's belt; photos by cousin Zul

L E I C E S T E R 

Leicester
Leicester
zara turtleneck; urban outfitters skirt; new look shoes

Leicester
Leicester
photo credits to Bohemian Brighties 

M U S E E  D U  L O U V R E  -  P A R I S

Paris
dkny bag; dorothy perkins dress & coat; new look shoes; top shop cap; photo by Qeela

L E E D S

Leeds
Leeds
Leeds
endless rose coat; zara men cap; hand me down top; zara red tied t; vintage bag; photos by Qeela

B U C K I N G H A M S H I R E

Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
joss and florence poncho and leather bag (local boutique); zara shoes; unknown korean brand dress; photos by Troy 


So when one of my uni friends sarcastically asked me how my "modelling" blog was going, I shrugged and replied him "fashion blogging is a serious hobby".

Thursday, 14 August 2014

The relationship between Travel and Wear

Oman Trip
Oman, Muscat July 2014

Cruise collections were first introduced as mid season clothing lines created as a wardrobe for travel wear. Designers and couturiers saw the birth of a whole new season that didn't have to be defined by the current climate state but more on the places that you, as a client of fashion are expected to go. The fashion industry tends to feed on the idea that a different situation and time (season or place) is enough of a reason to change your whole attire. Said client is anticipated to naturally reach for something out of their ordinary ensemble when not in their usual homebound. A foreign colour? A pair of new jeans?  Or perhaps all the clothes you've neglected and felt were not suited enough to wear unless you were in a completely different environment surrounded by people who don't know or care about you. Society moulds the concept of having a time and place for everything, especially when it comes to clothes. Society has never been so right.

Of course on a daily basis, this wouldn't cut through. Even I (a self proclaimed fashion enthusiast) do not, just for sanity reasons. However, this post is not about fashion on a daily basis, it's about fashion being flexible enough even beyond the space you can see your current self being comfortable in. The relationship between travel and wear can be very interesting.

Oman Trip
Oman Trip
aniqah collections scarf; zara sandals; warehouse top; moschino bag; vintage skirt

These changes and ideas didn't just create themselves, people and history contributed towards them. Like most teenage fashion enthusiasts, my form of inspiration seeking mostly come from mainstream sources like magazine issues and endless scrolling on tumblr and instagram. Of course this doesn't mean i'm limited to that but I will admit these sources play a major role in my wardrobe. But what about the top dogs who make these issues, write those editorials, design the runway clothes that influence those tumblr and instagram photos? Where do they get their inspiration? Walking around the Muttrah souk in Muscat, I was sparked by the detailing of literally....everything. Silverware, Islamic architecture, colours, repetitive patterns, food etc. I was left dangling because not even being there was satisfyingly enough to take it all in.

Oman Trip
Oman Trip
Oman Trip
Oman Trip
Oman Trip
Oman Trip
You wouldn't expect Lagerfeld to be perched in front of his laptop early in the morning, scrolling down his tumblr dashboard while sipping some green tea. These people travel in their minds (or literally just travel, who knows?) , to a different place or time looking for a vision we will incorporate and the fashion world will spend more money than time would ever replace.
Oman Trip
Oman Trip
zara top; aniqah collections shawl
Oman Trip

Oman Trip
h&m scarf and blazer; river island top; zara pants; moschino bag; missoni shades
Oman Trip
Oman Trip

Maybe some high end designer out there was nostalgic for a trend set in the 90's, then all of a sudden - Juju sandals and all things holographic were making their way back on display in high end stores after a whole decade of neglect. Another wanted to combine the irony of fat food colours and humour, thus a whole line of McDs inspired clothing was put out. It's no doubt that Elie Saab has some of that eastern mix floating around with things like the choices of his materials and embroidery, Queen Rania of Jordan didn't roam around in his design without a cultural reason other than it's aesthetics. And a couple of 'let's beat the social system' spirited designers wanted to prove that embracing ugly passé was more beautiful than the time society has dedicated in installing what clothing tastes gender roles are expected to wear. Pool sliders and socks are more in trend than ever before, not to mention the critics that follow after. 

Maybe we should stop draping things on our body for the sake of it and actually put some thought into what brought us to put it on. Wherever and whenever. 

Oman Trip


Most photos and video clips were taken by my sister Iman and a few by Rab (thanks guys!).